Damping Grease

Damping grease can be a cost effective engineering tool to control the motion, noise and tactile feel of moving parts. Designers and manufacturers use damping greases as an economical way to build fine tolerances into their products.

The ‘velvet feel’ and virtually silent operation of the focusing mechanisms on microscopes, zoom lenses and other optical instruments is often due to the use of a damping grease. Also the fact that and optical lens doesn’t continue to ‘coast’ when the focus mechanism is stopped can also be the result of a damping grease applied to the focusing threads. Synthetic damping grease can also be used with many mechanical and electrical items/components; generally damping grease is more relevant (but not limited to) any customer operated components such as electronic controls like potentiometers where there is a need to ensure smooth, quiet, controlled motion and make very precise settings possible by hand.

Please take a look at the various damping grease related articles below, including test videos, theory and product selection help.

Lubricant Additive overview

Lubricant Additive overview

There are a variety lubricant additives that we have the ability to include in our grease formulations. Note that we describe our additives, we use terminology relating to the benefit of the additive rather than than giving details of the chemical way in which the benefit is achieved; we don’t…

Pour Point test (ASTM D-97)

Pour Point test (ASTM D-97)

The purpose of the Pour Point test is to help define the lowest operating temperature for an oil. During this relatively simple test, the temperature is slowly reduced and it is noted at what point the fluid becomes too viscous to flow. Some times Pour Point is referred to as…

Grease thickener characteristics

Grease thickener characteristics

The grease range we offer uses a wide variety of thickener systems. The various characteristics of the thickener (also known as gellant – US terminology) gives the ability of our grease formulators to meet the challenges faced by our customers. Formulating a grease generally involves balancing the pros and cons…

Introduction to Silicone

Introduction to Silicone

The Silicone oil family is a group of synthetic polymers that combine an inorganic silicon-oxygen backbone with organic side chains, which can include methyl, phenyl and trifluoropropyl. Variations on the chemical structure affect the properties. Silicones are also called Polysiloxanes. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) are the most common silicone used commercially. PAO summary:…

Understanding Kinematic Viscosity

Understanding Kinematic Viscosity

Kinematic Viscosity (KV) is a type of viscosity data point that you will see on all our synthetic lubricant technical data sheets. There are different ways to measure the viscosity of a lubricant as the subject matter is not simple. Kinematic Viscosity is an oil/fluid resistance to flow under the…

Motorcycle Ride by Wire Throttle Damping-Case Study

Motorcycle Ride by Wire Throttle Damping-Case Study

A modern motorcycle ride by wire throttle (sometimes called ‘drive by wire’) refers to the absence of mechanical linkage between the accelerator and throttle. Older and conventional motorcycle throttles utilise a cable twist grip with considerably more friction in the mechanism preventing inadvertent opening of the throttle, for example when going…

PTFE thickener introduction

PTFE thickener introduction

Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is a fluorocarbon-based polymer which has the appearance of a white powder but the particle size varies from micron to sub-micron; final particle size depends on the milling process. The polymerisation process controls the molecular weight of PTFE and the density is approximately 2.2 g/ml. PTFE has a…

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