Damping Grease

Damping grease can be a cost effective engineering tool to control the motion, noise and tactile feel of moving parts. Designers and manufacturers use damping greases as an economical way to build fine tolerances into their products.

The ‘velvet feel’ and virtually silent operation of the focusing mechanisms on microscopes, zoom lenses and other optical instruments is often due to the use of a damping grease. Also the fact that and optical lens doesn’t continue to ‘coast’ when the focus mechanism is stopped can also be the result of a damping grease applied to the focusing threads. Synthetic damping grease can also be used with many mechanical and electrical items/components; generally damping grease is more relevant (but not limited to) any customer operated components such as electronic controls like potentiometers where there is a need to ensure smooth, quiet, controlled motion and make very precise settings possible by hand.

Please take a look at the various damping grease related articles below, including test videos, theory and product selection help.

Lubricants and possible plastic or rubber compatibility issues

Lubricants and possible plastic or rubber compatibility issues

If you are trialling the use of a grease or oil in a prototype device then you will appreciate how crucial lubricants can be; extending the functional life of components, improving the tactile feel of customer operated controls…the reasons to include a lubricant are many and well worthwhile. Before you…

Introduction to Polybutene

Introduction to Polybutene

Polybutenes (also called Polybutylenes or Polyisobutylenes) are hydrocarbon synthetic fluids produced by the co-polymerisation of butenes and isobutenes. Polybutenes differ from most other oils by decomposing at temperatures of 250°C to 275°C through a depolymerisation or unzipping mechanism. Polybutene summary: Typically we blend polybutenes with Polyalphaolefin (PAO). Keep in mind…

Introduction to Polyalphaolefin (PAO)

Introduction to Polyalphaolefin (PAO)

Polyalphaolefin (PAO) oils are stable, lubricious fluids that are compatible with most plastics and elastomers. PAO oils are considered a great replacement for petroleum based products, are used in countless applications and industry sectors. PAO summary: Temperature range of -60 to 125°C Relatively low cost Excellent wear reduction Good plastic/elastomer…

What is grease?

What is grease?

What constitutes a grease? There are three main components that make a grease, base oil, thickener (sometimes called gellent) and an additive package. Making a grease is thought to be like extreme cooking and in the video, we tried to give an insight into the almost bewildering options and permutations…

Why choose a grease rather than an oil?

Why choose a grease rather than an oil?

Why should you choose a grease rather than an oil, if you have the choice? There are some simple or practical reasons and some more chemical advantages. First and foremost, a grease will ‘stay in place’. How good a grease is at staying where it has been applied is down…

Base oil viscosity demonstration

Base oil viscosity demonstration

When selecting a synthetic grease for a customer, we often discuss oil viscosity and the implications of higher and lower base oil for their application. We decided to make it easier with a video explanation so our customers can better understand the centistoke (cSt) numbers on a data sheet. This…

Compatibility testing format for lubricant exposure to plastic or rubber

Compatibility testing format for lubricant exposure to plastic or rubber

Making sure a lubricant does not have any compatibility issues with a plastic or rubber is very important, especially if you are similar to our typical customer and are using one of our synthetic lubricants inside your own finished device that will be manufactured in large volumes; any deformation or…

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